What is Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS)? How does it Function?

Anti-Braking System Definition ABS is an abbreviation for Anti-lock Brake System. ABS is used in most current vehicles. In general, anti-lock brakes are designed to stop skidding, and four-wheel anti-lock brakes help the driver to keep up steering control during braking. How it works? ABS utilizes electronic controls and sensors to control braking power during hard […]

Anti-Braking System Definition

ABS is an abbreviation for Anti-lock Brake System. ABS is used in most current vehicles. In general, anti-lock brakes are designed to stop skidding, and four-wheel anti-lock brakes help the driver to keep up steering control during braking.

How it works?

ABS utilizes electronic controls and sensors to control braking power during hard braking, while the driver steps on the brakes strongly without pumping them. Maximum brake force is applied when the tyres are turning at a specific speed in respect to the vehicle’s speed (i.e., when the wheels aren’t locked and skidding). ABS detects the turn of the wheels and “pumps” the brakes for the driver, “trying” to keep the wheel speed close to the speed required for optimal braking performance. Most importantly, ABS stops the vehicle from skidding, and four-wheel ABS allows the driver to steer around dangers in emergency braking situations.

Different feeling with ABS

The difference between driving a vehicle with ABS and one without is that with ABS, you should never pump the brakes. When you’re braking hard with ABS, you focus on braking hard, and the electronics will do the “pumping” for you.

First, ABS will just feel distinct from ordinary brakes when you’re braking hard. During “normal” braking (i.e., not a “panic” stop), you should brake in the same way whether you have ABS or not, and the brakes should react similarly.

When you start hard braking, the anti-lock braking system might be activated. When this happens, you may encounter quick throbs or vibrations of the brake pedal, it might feel like the brakes are “pushing back at you,” or the pedal may all of a sudden drop. Also, the valves in the ABS controller may make a clamor that sounds like “grinding” or “humming.” These are not signs that the ABS is not working, they are signs that the ABS is working, so in case you’re braking hard, and this happens, it simply means keep the brake pedal pressed down.

credits: aaafoundation.org

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